Apostolic Nunciature

Film reviews kindly contributed by His Excellency, Archbishop Marek Zalewski.

Final Report (2020)

Final Report, a Hungarian production, is a self-conscious, self-referential work / acting as a summative account of its filmmaker’s lifelong project. The film has a very precise balance of comedy and tragedy. 

This movie is as much the filmmaker’s on the state of our society today, and particularly modern Hungary, as it is of his sprightly, passionate lead character.

Many great self-referential films have an element of auto-critique; here, Ivan is almost a deified figure who represents all that is good and worldly, the last bastion against a country sick to its soul.

Finally, it’s important to point out that the technique of recording and mediating may have changed many times, and even the cinema as a community space may disappear. But capturing the emotions and thoughts rippling on a living face / and elevating them to the rank of art / remains one of the wonders of humanity. And if one would still like to be with others in the future, the cinema will remain.

Finally, it’s important to point out that the technique of recording and mediating may have changed many times, and even the cinema as a community space may disappear. But capturing the emotions and thoughts rippling on a living face / and elevating them to the rank of art / remains one of the wonders of humanity. And if one would still like to be with others in the future, the cinema will remain.

To The Unknown God (2019)

To the Unknown God, released in 2019, deals with many problems of our modern society: the end of life, palliative care, and the grieving process. Italian Director Rodolfo Bisatti addresses a social issue that is still too often dealt with / in a nebulous way, almost with silence. In my opinion, it’s a challenging and difficult movie to watch. But it’s a film that is very real and relevant / as it talks about ourselves, it deals with the need to look after another person, starting with our own.

This film goes against the grain and is completely unrelated to any fashion, topicality, contingency to become a work / that is to some extent timeless. 

Mr. Bisatti is clear in his choices and with equal clarity he specifies, I quote: “A society that does not think about death is destined to die…..Living in the awareness of death does not mean being subjected to it but, on the contrary, managing one’s time in a better way, investing in the essential aspects of life. A vision that is not materialistic, but that sees the splendour of Being-there in everyday things; the Wonder.”

The result is an intense film / full of an under-ground magnetism, a true vital force, but dark, which captures for its effectiveness that becomes simple but not simplified.

In the end there remains a dilemma, which is the unknown god to which the mortal human turns? Bisatti’s film leaves the doors open without loading his story with religious elements / useful for interpreting the thought and giving answers to the questions.